Doctrine Matters – Excerpt from Christianity and Liberalism – J. Gresham Machen

Taken from Chapter 2 of Christianity and Liberalism.

Certainly with regard to Paul himself there should be no debate; Paul certainly was not indifferent to doctrine; on the contrary, doctrine was the very basis of his life. His devotion to doctrine did not, it is true, make him incapable of a magnificent tolerance. One notable example of such tolerance is to be found during his imprisonment at Rome, as attested by the Epistle to the Philippians. Apparently certain Christian teachers at Rome had been jealous of Paul’s greatness. As long as he had been at liberty they had been obliged to take a secondary place; but now that he was in prison, they seized the supremacy. They sought to raise up affliction for Paul in his bonds; they preached Christ even of envy and strife. In short, the rival preachers made of the preaching of the gospel a means to the gratification of low personal ambition; it seems to have been about as mean a piece of business as could well be conceived. But Paul was not disturbed.

“Whether in pretence, or in truth,” he said, “Christ is preached;
and I therein do rejoice, yea, and will rejoice” (Phil. 1:18).

The way in which the preaching was being carried on was wrong, but the message itself was true; and Paul was far more interested in the content of the message than in the manner of its presentation. It is impossible to conceive a finer piece of broad-minded tolerance. But the tolerance of Paul was not indiscriminate. He displayed no tolerance, for example, in Galatia. There, too, there were rival preachers. But Paul had no tolerance for them.

“But though we,” he said, “or an angel from heaven, preach any other gospel unto you than that which we have preached unto you, let him be accursed” (Gal. 1:8).

What is the reason for the difference in the apostle’s attitude in the two cases? What is the reason for the broad tolerance in Rome, and the fierce anathemas in Galatia? The answer is perfectly plain. In Rome, Paul was tolerant, because there the content of the message that was being proclaimed by the rival teachers was true; in Galatia he was intolerant, because there the content of the rival message was false. In neither case did personalities have anything to do with Paul’s attitude. No doubt the motives of the Judaizers in Galatia were far from pure, and in an incidental way Paul does point out their impurity. But that was not the ground of his opposition. The Judaizers no doubt were morally far from perfect, but Paul’s opposition to them would have been exactly the same if they had all been angels from heaven.

His opposition was based altogether upon the falsity of their teaching; they were substituting for the one true gospel a false gospel which was no gospel at all. It never occurred to Paul that a gospel might be true for one man and not for another; the blight of pragmatism had never fallen upon his soul.

Paul was convinced of the objective truth of the gospel message, and devotion to that truth was the great passion of his life. Christianity for Paul was not only a life, but also a doctrine, and logically the doctrine came first.

But what was the difference between the teaching of Paul and the teaching of the Judaizers? What was it that gave rise to the stupendous polemic of the Epistle to the Galatians?

To the modern Church the difference would have seemed to be a mere theological subtlety. About many things the Judaizers were in perfect agreement with Paul. The Judaizers believed that Jesus was the Messiah; there is not a shadow of evidence that they objected to Paul’s lofty view of the person of Christ. Without the slightest doubt, they believed that Jesus had really risen from the dead. They believed, moreover, that faith in Christ was necessary to salvation. But the trouble was, they believed that something else was also necessary; they believed that what Christ had done needed to be pieced out by the believer’s own effort to keep the Law.

From the modern point of view the difference would have seemed to be very slight. Paul as well as the Judaizers believed that the keeping of the law of God, in its deepest import, is inseparably connected with faith. The difference concerned only the logical—not even, perhaps, the temporal—order of three steps.

Paul said that a man:

(1) first believes on Christ, (2) then is justified before God, (3) then immediately proceeds to keep God’s law.

The Judaizers said that a man:

(1) believes on Christ and, (2) keeps the law of God the best he can, and then (3) is justified.

The difference would seem to modern “practical” Christians to be a highly subtle and intangible matter, hardly worthy of consideration at all in view of the large measure of agreement in the practical realm. What a splendid cleaning up of the Gentile cities it would have been if the Judaizers had succeeded in extending to those cities the observance of the Mosaic law, even including the unfortunate ceremonial observances!

Surely Paul ought to have made common cause with teachers who were so nearly in agreement with him; surely he ought to have applied to them the great principle of Christian unity.

As a matter of fact, however, Paul did nothing of the kind; and only because he (and others) did nothing of the kind does the Christian Church exist to-day.

Paul saw very clearly that the difference between the Judaizers and himself was the difference between two entirely distinct types of religion; it was the difference between a religion of merit and a religion of grace. If Christ provides only a part of our salvation, leaving us to provide the rest, then we are still hopeless under the load of sin. For no matter how small the gap which must be bridged before salvation can be attained, the awakened conscience sees clearly that our wretched attempt at goodness is insufficient even to bridge that gap. The guilty soul enters again into the hopeless reckoning with God, to determine whether we have really done our part. And thus we groan again under the old bondage of the law. Such an attempt to piece out the work of Christ by our own merit, Paul saw clearly, is the very essence of unbelief; Christ will do everything or nothing, and the only hope is to throw ourselves unreservedly on His mercy and trust Him for all.

Paul certainly was right. The difference which divided him from the Judaizers was no mere theological subtlety, but concerned the very heart and core of the religion of Christ. “Just as I am without one plea, But that Thy blood was shed for me”—that was what Paul was contending for in Galatia; that hymn would never have been written if the Judaizers had won. And without the thing which that hymn expresses there is no Christianity at all.

Certainly, then, Paul was no advocate of an undogmatic religion; he was interested above everything else in the objective and universal truth of his message. So much will probably be admitted by serious historians, no matter what their own personal attitude toward the religion of Paul may be. Sometimes, indeed, the modern liberal preacher seeks to produce an opposite impression by quoting out of their context words of Paul which he interprets in a way as far removed as possible from the original sense. The truth is, it is hard to give Paul up. The modern liberal desires to produce upon the minds of simple Christians (and upon his own mind) the impression of some sort of continuity between modern liberalism and the thought and life of the great Apostle. But such an impression is altogether misleading. Paul was not interested merely in the ethical principles of Jesus; he was not interested merely in general principles of religion or of ethics.

On the contrary, he was interested in the redeeming work of Christ and its effect upon us. His primary interest was in Christian doctrine, and Christian doctrine not merely in its presuppositions but at its centre. If Christianity is to be made independent of doctrine, then Paulinism must be removed from Christianity root and branch.

Machen, J. G. (2009). Christianity and Liberalism (New Edition.). Grand Rapids, MI; Cambridge, U.K.: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company.

 

Screen Shot 2015-04-22 at 7.15.04 AM

 

Thought 1:

If what J. Gresham Machen says is trueand it is, then any message that calls believers to do what Jesus did (imperative), without first proclaiming who Jesus is and what he has already done (indicative),  is simply another form of liberalism.  The majority of American mega-church pastors preach a moralistic message as they call the church to try harder, be a good neighbor, be a good husband, feed the poor, provide children with book bags, etc.   With few exceptions will you hear a mega-church pastor preach on precious doctrines of the faith such as  atonement, hell, justification, the attributes of God, etc.  Where the Gospel should be thundered the loudest, soul damning moralism, ethics, social justice is preached instead.  This is all accomplished apart from proclamation of the person and work of Jesus Christ.   Any preaching that is void of Christian doctrine and the person and work of Jesus Christ can only be described as liberalism. 

“but we preach Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and folly to Gentiles”
1 Corinthians 2:23

Thought 2:

It is true that there is a time for everything under the sun, and that would include tolerance.  But in our politically correct world, where every form of sexual sin and immoral behavior falls under the label of “tolerance”, we must also remember that there is a time to be intolerant as well.  Whenever a preacherno matter how famous, deviates from the essential doctrines of Christianity and preaches another gospel, that is the time our tolerance must become intolerance!  We must never lock arms with false teachers like T.D. Jakes, Creflo Dollar, Kenneth Copeland, Jessie Duplantis, Fredrick Price, Rick Warren, Patricia King, Ed Young, Jr., Myles Monroe, Joseph Prince, Steven Furtick, Joyce Meyer, Christine Cain, Rod Parsley, Brian Houston, Joel Osteen, Pat Robertson, Benny Hinn, Paula White, Rob Bell, Mike Bickle, Cindy Jacobs, Bill Johnson, Brian McLaren, Bethel Music, TBN, God TV, Jesus Culture, Philips, Craig & Dean, to name just a few.

When prosperity, word of faith, self-esteem, visions and dreams, social justice, erroneous views of salvation, and the Trinity are promulgated, our only option is intolerance.  

“But even if we or an angel from heaven should preach to you a gospel contrary to the one we preached to you, let him be accursed.” Galatians 1:8

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s